City Guide

City guide Munich: we go beyond the classics ...

Our city guide Munich is for foodies, culture vultures, adventurous travellers and anyone who is curious about Munich insider tips from locals. Even if you’ve never been to Munich, you’re sure to know these sights: the Oktoberfest, the English Garden, the Hofbräuhaus and the Deutsches Museum. But what about the Werksviertel, where night turns into day? Or the MUCA, Germany’s first museum of urban and contemporary art? The Umadum Ferris wheel, giving you a fantastic bird’s-eye view of Munich? Or the majestic Nymphenburg Palace? We have some really great Munich insider tips in our city guide Munich that we’d love to share with you. You can find a teaser here.

Rhythm is a dancer Dance like nobody’s watching
Pleasure meets leasure Age ain’t nothing but a number
You and the city It’s all about the gram
Foodie’s love language Through the stomach, to the heart
Culture Shock Let us entertain you!

Café Bangkok: Sawadee and Servus!

Leopoldstrasse has always been known as Schwabing’s nightlife district. If you take a few steps into the basement of house number 49, you will end up in a brick vault – and seemingly right in the hustle and bustle of Bangkok.

The inspiration for the interior and the way of presenting the cocktails comes directly from the Asian mega-metropolis. In the red light of the bar, you can make yourself comfortable in the lounge and standing areas as well as in small seating niches. The later the evening, the more palpable the DJ music becomes. Just like the drinks on offer, it is varied and ensures that everyone has a good evening at Café Bangkok. Beer, wine, non-alcoholic drinks and, of course, cocktails in porcelain coconut or pineapple vessels are on the drinks menu. The motto ‘yes to all’ applies to the music, the guests and the drinks.

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Wallace Bar: for a sophisticated bar evening

The Wallace Bar was named after Mia Wallace from Pulp Fiction and has exactly the dignified ambience you would expect from a classic bar, such as those often found in Anglo-American countries.

Dark wood panelling and dark-green bar stools, lots of brass and a large selection of cocktails. A DJ plays at the weekend, but the bar never turns into a club. The focus is clearly on liquid delights. Some signature drinks are named after Tarantino films, but there are also classic cocktails, a selection of whiskies and wines and a monthly changing menu with specials. A few nibbles are also on offer. The bar is located in the heart of Altschwabing, close to Münchner Freiheit underground station. So you can definitely have another drink.

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Schwabinger 7: now rocking at number 15

Legendary, an institution, iconic – Schwabinger 7 belongs in Schwabing’s Feilitzschstrasse like the statue of Bavaria on the Theresienwiese. Even though the bar had to move a few blocks away to number 15 back in 2011, at its heart, the establishment is still a slightly dressed-up but honest place with rock ’n’ roll flair and many regulars.

You’ll find lots of beer as well as live music and highly philosophical conversations at the bar with authentic characters. The later the evening, the more of it. This traditional Boazn is one of the few bars in the area around the Münchner Freiheit that has managed to retain its calm and down-to-earth character. Hipster vibes abound – but neither the guests, nor the selection of drinks in the Schwasi are much impressed by this.

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Bavaria Filmstadt: lights, camera … action!

Have you always wanted to take a look behind the scenes of a film production? And see the set of your favourite series? Over 100 years ago, the first film studio in southern Germany was established. Today, Bavaria Filmstadt is a modern, moving film campus and temporary workplace for numerous national and international stars.

In the approx. 1.5-hour guided tour, you will explore part of the site that is more than 300,000 square metres in size. But the film and television studio also includes the Filmstadt 4D cinema and a Hologate virtual reality game. The films and series that were filmed here in full or in scenes include the live-action adaptation of Michael Ende’s classic book Jim Knopf und Lukas der Lokomotivführer, Die Rosenheim-Cops, Das Boot and Fack ju Göhte.

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Hellabrunn Zoo: a wickedly wild journey around the world

A kingdom for around 18,500 animals – or rather, an entire nature reserve. Situated in the Isar floodplains and easily accessible by public transport, Munich’s Hellabrunn Zoo, founded in 1911, is one of the most renowned scientifically managed zoos in Europe.

Over 500 animal species inhabit the area in natural communities that are organised by continent: from the polar regions to Africa, from Europe to Asia, and from America to Australia. Introduced in 1928, this division makes Hellabrunn the first geo-zoo in the world. Marvel at the animals – from giraffes and llamas to the green anaconda – at your own pace or on a guided tour of the 40-hectare zoo. You can also take part in training sessions and feedings of the animals. Of course, there is also a shop and a range of culinary offers to enjoy!

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Planetenweg: a short journey into outer space along the Isar

Admittedly, in the space of a planet, 4.5 kilometres is not even worth mentioning, but on earth it’s a good distance for a nice walk. The so-called Planet Trail from the Deutsches Museum to Hellabrunn Zoo is all about the sun – and there is a small version of it in the courtyard of the renowned technical and scientific institution.

Starting from the sun, you walk southwards along the Isar from planet to planet and learn interesting facts about the solar system on information boards. Along the way, you’ll encounter Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. And speaking of distance: to cover one kilometre on this route, we would have to travel 1.29 billion kilometres in space. Once you arrive at the zoo, you can stop for refreshments or take the underground back.

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Umadum Ferris Wheel: a hearty snack with a view

Umadum – for all those who have not yet taken a ‘Bavarian for beginners’ course, here’s the translation into High German: ‘rundherum’, meaning ‘all around’. This refers not only to the ride, but above all to the view from a height of almost 80 metres.

Each of the 27 gondolas offers magnificent panoramic views of Munich, including landmarks such as the Frauenkirche and the Olympic Tower all the way to the Alps. The ride in a gondola takes around 30 minutes. On request, not in the standard model – and only if booked in advance – you can enjoy sitting in your own exclusive gondola capsule with up to seven people. There’s a table and chairs and even an optional drinks package to choose from. And if you really can’t get enough of the Bavarian lifestyle, then you can book the ‘Exclusive Gondel Bavaria’ with traditional Weißwurst (Bavarian veal sausage). Enjoy the local delicacy and the ride!

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Werksviertel-Mitte: Munich’s visionary urban quarter

Things are happening at Munich’s Ostbahnhof railway station: the Werksviertel with its hip Container Collective is like a small world of its own, where everything that is fun is bundled together in a manageably sized urban district.

The area is home to artists, various catering concepts such as an Alpine hut, bars and dance clubs, a few shops and leisure facilities. Just a few years ago, potato dumplings from a large food manufacturer were produced here. Now the area is home to creatives, after-work revellers, clubbers, business people, architecture fans, curious locals, people looking for a future home and tourists who want to get to know Munich from a completely different and exciting perspective. Two-hour guided tours of the Werksviertel-Mitte are also regularly offered.

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Bapas: Bavarian-style tapas

One letter makes all the difference – replace the ‘t’ in ‘tapas’ with a ‘b’ and you have a local version of the small appetisers that are eaten in Spain.

Here in Munich, at Bapas, Bavarian tapas are served from morning to night – of course, with beer or beer pairing. The small dishes are perfect for those who like to try everything. For breakfast, there are sweet and savoury dishes; at lunchtime, meat loaf, ox shreds in a pretzel and pulled pork burger in a pretzel roll, for example; and in the evening, salmon, cheese spaetzle, roast pork and edamame falafel. Our tip: make sure you leave room for dessert! And if you do start to feel full, the Leopoldstrasse invites you to take a stroll.

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Café Bangkok: Sawadee and Servus!

Leopoldstrasse has always been known as Schwabing’s nightlife district. If you take a few steps into the basement of house number 49, you will end up in a brick vault – and seemingly right in the hustle and bustle of Bangkok.

The inspiration for the interior and the way of presenting the cocktails comes directly from the Asian mega-metropolis. In the red light of the bar, you can make yourself comfortable in the lounge and standing areas as well as in small seating niches. The later the evening, the more palpable the DJ music becomes. Just like the drinks on offer, it is varied and ensures that everyone has a good evening at Café Bangkok. Beer, wine, non-alcoholic drinks and, of course, cocktails in porcelain coconut or pineapple vessels are on the drinks menu. The motto ‘yes to all’ applies to the music, the guests and the drinks.

Read more

Wallace Bar: for a sophisticated bar evening

The Wallace Bar was named after Mia Wallace from Pulp Fiction and has exactly the dignified ambience you would expect from a classic bar, such as those often found in Anglo-American countries.

Dark wood panelling and dark-green bar stools, lots of brass and a large selection of cocktails. A DJ plays at the weekend, but the bar never turns into a club. The focus is clearly on liquid delights. Some signature drinks are named after Tarantino films, but there are also classic cocktails, a selection of whiskies and wines and a monthly changing menu with specials. A few nibbles are also on offer. The bar is located in the heart of Altschwabing, close to Münchner Freiheit underground station. So you can definitely have another drink.

Read more

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Volkssternwarte Munich: the sky is not the limit

To reach the Bavarian Observatory in Munich, you have to climb 35 metres to the top of a listed former bunker on the edge of the Werksviertel district. From the roof – even without a telescope – you have a wonderful view over Munich and, on a clear day, also over the mountain panorama.

But the best view opens up at night: millions of light years into space. The Münchner Sternstunden evening tours take place almost every evening at the observatory, which was founded in 1947. Tour guides tell you all about the planets, comets and constellations. A total of five large, permanently installed telescopes with a mirror aperture of up to 80 centimetres or the ZEISS planetarium are bound to give you a completely new perspective on the universe. Courses, lectures and workshops are also offered, especially for children.

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Planetenweg: a short journey into outer space along the Isar

Admittedly, in the space of a planet, 4.5 kilometres is not even worth mentioning, but on earth it’s a good distance for a nice walk. The so-called Planet Trail from the Deutsches Museum to Hellabrunn Zoo is all about the sun – and there is a small version of it in the courtyard of the renowned technical and scientific institution.

Starting from the sun, you walk southwards along the Isar from planet to planet and learn interesting facts about the solar system on information boards. Along the way, you’ll encounter Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. And speaking of distance: to cover one kilometre on this route, we would have to travel 1.29 billion kilometres in space. Once you arrive at the zoo, you can stop for refreshments or take the underground back.

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Schleißheim Palace: baroque architecture and garden art

The Schleißheim Palace complex consists of the Old Palace, the New Palace, Lustheim Palace and a park. The significance of the park is in no way inferior to that of the buildings, as the greenery forms one of the most important baroque gardens in Europe.

The water features, fountains, cascades and so-called broderies (stylistic elements of baroque French garden design) epitomise the landscaped areas of this period. To this day, the main features of the 17th- and 18th-century gardens remain almost unchanged and can be visited as part of themed tours for children and adults. Between April and September, fascinating 30-minute water displays are held daily. And if you want to take a piece of history home with you, why not buy a bottle of Schleißheim Palace brandy in the shop?

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